Ellie Dawes
Posted by
Ellie Dawes

Charlotte Parr's story

Ellie Dawes
Posted by
Ellie Dawes
11 Jan 2013

Charlotte Parr was diagnosed with leukaemia in 2008 at the age of 3.

“We were on a family holiday and we noticed Charlotte was covered in bruises. She had no appetite or energy and when we got back I took her to the GP. She was referred for tests at Addenbrooke’s and we found out that she may have leukaemia,” says Charlotte’s mum, Suzie

“The minute they say leukaemia your heart just sinks,” said Suzie. “I thought I knew what it was, and I think a lot of people believe blood cancers are quite straight forward to treat these days, but they’re not. There are so many different types.”

“After weeks of waiting on tests it seemed she had a rare mixture between acute myeloid leukaemia and juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia. Charlotte had many rounds of gruelling chemotherapy and after months of treatment we had the wonderful news that she had gone into remission.

“She was so brave and stoical – that’s always been her nature. Despite the side effects, having the chemotherapy actually made her feel better – the leukaemia had made her so ill.

“But it was on her birthday in 2009 I noticed she was really tired. I took her to the doctors and we found out the leukaemia had come back and she would need a transplant immediately. Luckily it went really well - that was October and she’s been in remission ever since. She’s back to school and it’s like she’s never been away. She’s such a bubbly character.”

Charlotte’s bravery has inspired family and friends in their village of Steeple Morden to raise an amazing £30,000 for Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research.

"Research is so important because treatment has already come so far but maybe one day there can be a cure for all blood cancers. Just five years ago, we are told, Charlotte would not have been with us today,” says Suzie.

Find out how our research is beating childhood leukaemia