Eleanor Baggley
Posted by
Eleanor Baggley

Research Roundup

Eleanor Baggley
Posted by
Eleanor Baggley
26 Jul 2014

Research Roundup is here to highlight the various research projects that are being worked on in hospitals and labs across the UK, and the benefits this is bringing to patients.  We have some examples below of research we’re funding and ways we’re working to increase public awareness and access to clinical trials.

However we want to hear from you - if you would like to highlight a particular research project you’re working on, or discuss how new research is impacting your nursing care, do let us know and we’d love to feature this in future newsletters.

Improving survival rates in childhood leukaemia

Approximately 60 new cAML patients are diagnosed per year in the UK and, whilst research into cALL has made huge improvments in the treatment and outlook of cALL, cAML is yet to see such progress. This month Bloodwise researchers in Newcastle have published a study which potentially indentifies a way of predicting the risk of relapse in cAML patients. For the first time the genetic fault, 'trisomy 4', has been found to signify a greater risk of relapse. Children with this specific alteration seemed to have a higher risk of relapse, but did also respond well to salvage therapy to overcome relapse. Researchers hope that by continuing to replicate the treatment stratification approach which underpins the successes in cALL, they will see long-term benefits in cAML. To find out more about this research, click here.

Genetic development behind CLL revealed

Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, have identified how an inherited genetic variant, associated with an increased risk of developing the most common type of leukaemia, helps cancer cells survive. The findings could lead to new ways to target the disease. Read more about this research in our blog.   

Innovation in clinical trials

Bloodwise's TAP Programme Manager, Emil Kazounis, shared a fascinating blog recently exploring the future of clinical trials. He begins by considering the current trial design, which is split into a number of phases, before moving on to elaborate on various new trial designs. Each new design has been devloped with the aim of better investigating rare diseases and accelerate drug testing, whilst simultaneously attempting to minimise patient numbers and time taken. Emil focuses on the adaptive, bucket and umbrella approaches, before focusing on the role of precision medicine in clinical research. To read Emil's blog and find out more about these new trial designs, click here.

Is this update interesting? We want to make sure that the information we’re sharing with you is as relevant and as useful as possible, so do let us know if you have any comments or if there’s anything else you’d rather see in our Reseach Roundup. Email support@bloodwise.org.uk with any comments.