Catriona Taylor
Posted by
Catriona Taylor

Student fundraising in the North

Catriona Taylor
Posted by
Catriona Taylor
23 Nov 2012

At Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research, we receive terrific support from Schools, Colleges, Universities and Youth Groups, who have chosen to fundraise to help beat blood cancers. We've had some exciting new supporters come on board in the last few weeks, and below we've got some details of University students fundraising for Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research here in the North which we're delighted to tell you about.

Leeds Metropolitan University
Elena Dransfield from Leeds Metropolitan University is planning a fundraising Fashion Show next year, and she has shared her story with us including why she is holding the event to raise funds to help beat blood cancers, "A group of friends and I are currently in the process of organising a fundraising event in the memory of my father, Michael Wayne Dransfield, who died of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia in July 2012.

My father was admitted to hospital just five days after coming home from a family holiday in which we were celebrating him and my mother’s 25th wedding anniversary. One week later he was diagnosed with leukaemia. He fought the illness but due to complications died just eight days later at the age of 50. Despite my father’s short fight against the illness myself, my family and my friends have made it our aim to make people aware of the cancer.

On February 8th 2013 we will be holding a charity fashion show at the Corn Exchange in Leeds. The event will allow local stores and boutiques to show off their products as well as giving an opportunity for those in attendance to purchase items afterwards. All ticket proceeds will be donated to Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research, as well as raffle ticket sales."

The University of York
Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research was successful in our application to be considered as one of the University of York Students' Union (YUSU) RAG's beneficiary charities for the 2012/2013 academic year.

RAG Chair, Becky Mursell let us know "YUSU RAG are really excited to be supporting Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research this year. With over 80 strong applicants to become one of our 5 beneficiaries for the year, they beat off some tough competition, showcasing just how passionate our students are about Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research’s cause.

We hope to raise as much money throughout the year with our fundraising efforts. These range from our large scale events like Winter Wonderland (an all-day Christmas celebration showing festive films and a pantomime, market stalls, and performances from a range of different societies), Woodstock (a 12 hour music festival showcasing the best talent on campus), and RAG Week (a full week dedicated to charity fundraising), to smaller scale bake sales and street collections in cities across the UK. We are really looking forward to presenting our cheque at the start of next year and to know that we have helped a great cause."

Durham University
Hannah and Jordan, two students from Durham University, chose to fundraise for Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research in the Durham University Charity Kommittee's Jailbreak fundraising event this November. The successful team came a brilliant 4th out of the 59 teams taking part, and the pair have raised over £540 to help beat blood cancers. They have shared the story of their fundraising journey with us:

"Escape! The principle of the DUCK Jailbreak is simple; you’ve broken out. You’ve no money, nothing but the clothes on your back, your fox-like cunning and a cardboard sign loudly proclaiming “Charity Hitchhikers!” You reckon you’ve got 36 hours before the law catch up to you, so in that time you’ve got to get as far away as possible in a desperate bid for freedom. And whilst doing it, you happen to be collecting for Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research on the way. So begins the jailbreak…

At 8am on Saturday 10th November, over 130 intrepid jailbreakers ran from the walls of Durham prison to the sound of the cathedral bells. In our handmade and incredibly colourful harlequin jester costumes we were going to be noticed, that much was certain. A brief sprint found us at a roundabout at the north end of Durham City, where we soon found a lift heading to the nearby motorway services.

Our offer of handmade cookies for a lift soon got us into a car with a young lady heading towards Leeds, who took us further than the junction she should have come off at, reasoning that once you’re late for work, 10 minutes won’t make too much difference. So began a series of lifts with, in no particular order, the “Tyne and Fear” Roller Derby team, a Co-op delivery driver and a whole host of men and women whose generosity helped rack up the miles between us and Durham City. Every time we stopped at a service station, it was heartening so see people so happy to donate to a cause as good as ours; our red buckets were never hidden and already getting pretty weighty.

Our journey took us all the way down to Folkstone in great time, but unfortunately we hit some bad luck, and with nowhere to stay overnight and the service station about to close, we ended up with an enlivening hitch back to the M25 with a Dutch truck driver who put us in better spirits!

The Sunday morning brought better luck, and a quick one service station jump with a gentleman heading towards Hastings rekindled the idea we might be able to leave the country. With just under 12 hours remaining, we managed to hitch a lift with a gentleman who just happened to be heading to Dover, and was kind enough to take two tired, oddly dressed charity hitchhikers with him. We thought we’d done well until he offered us even more; to take us to Luxembourg in the name of charity. So that’s how we found ourselves, 36 hours and 483m miles later, in Luxembourg.


Students Hannah and Jordan on their DUCK Jailbreak challenge

At the final count we raised £550, $5.05 and €3.24 for Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research, safe in the knowledge that it was going to a fantastic cause. Thinking about what we were doing this for really helped spur us on and keep us going, and hopefully we’ve helped in our own small way towards beating blood cancer once and for all."