Suzanne Beattie
Posted by
Suzanne Beattie

Your Impact: Kirsty Crozier

Suzanne Beattie
Posted by
Suzanne Beattie
30 Jun 2014

Kirsty Crozier on working with her team, caring for patients and engaging with Bloodwise

What’s your role and where do you work? Describe your team.

I am the Senior ANP for Haematology at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford. I specialise in Myeloid patients (AML, MDS, MPN etc). Within our Haematology Specialist Nursing Team we are all responsible for different conditions, so we are lucky to have Lymphoma, CLL, Myeloma, and Transplant nurses working within the service. We all bring different skills and personalities to the team, which makes it a very supportive environment to work in.

What are your main responsibilities?

My clinical work load involves helping to manage the myeloid patients, both on and off treatment. Roughly 50% of my time is spent making telephone calls to a large population of chronic patients and monitoring their bloods and altering treatment where necessary. The rest of my clinical time is seeing patients either on the Ward, Day Unit or Out Patients who are newly diagnosed, currently under going treatment or finished treatment. Being in this role allows for service developments, which enables us to adapt things to help meet the need of the patients under our care, and hopefully improve the service and care that we deliver.

I also have a managerial role which entails looking after the Haematology Specialist Nursing team at the Churchill. 

Why did you decide to do this role and is there an aspect of your role that you really enjoy?

I ended up doing this role as I had to move from Scotland and wanted to continue working with Haematology patients. Plus I love being a Haematology Nurse- there is no other job for me! I enjoy most parts of my role- but am probably less keen on the admin side of things!

What’s the most memorable moment you’ve had in your job?

Oh there are lots! Above all, every day I feel very privileged to be able to help guide patients at a time in their lives when all control is taken away. I see immense courage and strength in people that are given a blood cancer diagnosis. This is often something they don’t recognise in themselves. Every day my job makes me cherish life, and I feel so honoured to meet all these different people and have my life enriched by them.

How does your work impact on patients?

Oh that’s a difficult one! But hopefully in lots of ways! I always treat patients as if it were one of my family that I am looking after, therefore I hope that makes their encounters with me worthwhile. Service wise we have tried to improve the service to patients by doing things remotely, i.e. via telephone clinics, which avoids travelling or major disruption out of a patients day. Day to day- just being a point of contact for people is often enough to help them through, knowing that they can phone and ask questions or just talk to someone means a lot.

How has engaging with Bloodwise impacted on your work?

It has me up to a network of new experiences; I got to attend and speak at Impact Day a couple of years ago- which was just a brilliant day; involving patients in events, such as the prioritising patient focus groups; attending the Nurse Advisory Panel and networking with other nurses. These all help to impact on my day to day work- and allow for signposting to patients, carers and other health care professionals.

Finally, is there something you would like to see Bloodwise do in the future (for nurses or for patients)?

I would like to see much more patient involvement in their pathway- which will help to improve all stages of it. What works and what doesn’t work for patients, as sometimes in healthcare we have been doing the same thing for years, but that may not be the right thing for patients. Bloodwise have already made great progress with focus groups, and being able to continue this work in conjunction with the NHS, will enable us to tailor our services to suit Haematology patients, and hopefully continue to improve things for them.