Other clinical trials

Other clinical trials

We are funding research that is looking at using targeted radiotherapy in place of high dose chemotherapy when treating amyloidosis - a condition where the bone marrow makes abnormal plasma cells. Using a more targeted treatment may have less side effects than the chemotherapy.

 

Our researchers are also looking for new ways to treat people with Graft versus Host Disease who are no longer suitable for conventional steroid treatment, and are searching for ways to increase the effectiveness of stem cell or bone marrow transplants given from a brother or sister.

 

And we are supporting a trial that is optimising a treatment called donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), which is when white blood cells that come from the stem cell transplant donor can be used after transplantation to prevent relapse. 
 

Amyloidosis

Amyloidosis is a condition where the bone marrow makes abnormal plasma cells, which produce a protein called amyloid. Amyloid can build up in body tissues, affecting the way organs work.

Chemotherapy or high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant are usually given to treat AL amyloidosis - the most common form of amyloidosis. Although this approach is successful, many people suffer side effects from their treatment, such as serious infections and bleeding from the gut.

We are supporting a trial that is looking at using targeted radiotherapy in place of high dose chemotherapy in stem cell transplants. Using a more targeted treatment may have less side effects than the chemotherapy.

 

TRALA trial

Chief investigator - Dr Kim Orchard, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust
A phase I study of targeted radiotherapy alone for stem cell transplant conditioning in systemic AL amyloidosis
Chemotherapy or high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant are usually given to treat amyloidosis. Although this approach is successful, many people suffer side effects from their treatment, such as serious infections and bleeding from the gut. This trial wants to see if targeted radiotherapy given as part of a stem cell transplant is better than high dose chemotherapy, and if this has less side effects.

Mini transplants

Some people with blood cancers, such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma have a stem cell or bone marrow transplant using cells taken from their brother or sister. This is called a sibling allogeneic transplant. They often have lower doses of chemotherapy so it is sometimes called a mini transplant.

People who have a transplant take immunosuppressants - medications that damp down the immune system. This helps stop the new donor cells attacking the patient’s own cells – a condition called graft versus host disease (GvHD). But taking immunosuppressants also increases the risk of getting an infection.

Researchers think that giving a specific type of T cell called 'CD4 cells' may help boost immunity, reduce the risk of infection and prevent blood cancer returning in people undergoing mini transplants.

 

Preventing relapse post stem cell transplant

Stem cell transplantation may cure acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but unfortunately people can suffer a relapse after transplant. In this situation, there are limited treatment options, so preventing relapse is of great importance.

White blood cells called lymphocytes that come from the stem cell transplant donor can be used after transplantation to prevent relapse. This procedure is called a donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI). Currently there is a lack of detailed information surrounding what particular groups of people would do well on this type of treatment, and how the DLI should be given to optimise maximum benefit. 

We are supporting a trial that aims to assess the value of DLI. 

 

PRO-DLI trial

Chief investigator - Dr Victoria Potter, Kings College Hospital, London
Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) Chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)
A phase II prospective trial of prophylactic donor lymphocyte infusions for the prevention of relapse post HSCT in patients with high risk myeloid malignancy
Stem cell transplantation may cure acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but unfortunately people can suffer a relapse after transplant. Researchers want to see if giving white blood cells from the stem cell transplant donor can be used after transplantation to prevent relapse.