ProT4 Trial

Updated 11 Jun 2018
Chief investigator - Professor Ronjon Chakraverty, University College London
Prophylactic transfer of CD4 lymphocytes
Amount awarded: £286,977
Award start date: 01 Oct 2011
Award duration: 6 years (76 months)

This trial is looking at giving extra T cells after a mini transplant for cancers of the blood or lymphatic system.

Some people with blood cancers, such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma have a stem cell or bone marrow transplant using cells taken from their brother or sister. This is called a sibling allogeneic transplant. They often have lower doses of chemotherapy so it is sometimes called a mini (or reduced intensity) transplant.

People who have a transplant take immunosuppressants - medications that damp down the immune system. This helps stop the new donor cells attacking the patient’s own cells – a condition called graft versus host disease (GvHD). But taking immunosuppressants also increases the risk of getting an infection.

T cells are lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, which form part of our immune system. A specific set of T-cells called CD4 cells can recognise and kill cancer cells – something called the graft versus lymphoma, or graft versus leukaemia effect. Researchers think that giving CD4 cells may help boost immunity, reduce the risk of infection and prevent blood cancer returning in people undergoing mini transplants.

In this trial people are given extra CD4 cells from the donor a few months after the transplant, a procedure called donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI).

The aim of this trial is to find out if DLI will:

  • Help stop the blood cancer coming back
  • Help prevent or reduce the severity of GvHD
  • Affect the immune system
  • Reduce the risk of getting an infection

You may be eligible to join this trial if:

  • You have a blood cancer such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma
  • You are due to have a stem cell or bone marrow transplant using cells from your brother or sister (this is standard treatment, not part of the trial)
  • You are between 18 and 69 years old