MPNs or MDS TAP trials

MPNs or MDS TAP trials

We are supporting numerous myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) trials.

In MPN, we are looking to see if a drug that is already used in breast cancer, will work for people who have MPN who have certain gene changes commonly found in this type of blood cancer. We also want to improve the outlook of people with MPN who have relapsed after receiving chemotherapy. Another trial is testing a new combination of drugs.  

Our MDS trials want to improve the outlook of people who are unable to have high-intensity treatment, or relapse after a stem cell transplant.

TAP for MPNs

People with MPN can be given a variety of drugs to treat their condition, which includes aspirin, a mild chemotherapy called hydroxycarbamide, or interferon or anagrelide. Many people with MPN have changes in the JAK2 and CALR genes, and drugs that target these changes, such as ruxolitinib, have also been successful. 

But some people are unable to tolerate the side effects of these treatments, so researchers are searching for new ways to treat MPN.

We are supporting a trial that is testing if tamoxifen, which is already used in breast cancer, will work for people who have MPN with the JAK2 and the CALR gene change. We also want to see if ruxolitinib will work for people who have relapsed after receiving chemotherapy. Another trial is testing if two drugs that are usually given alone - chemotherapy and ruxolitinib - can be safely given together.

TAMARIN trial

Chief investigator - Professor Claire Harrison, Guys and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust
Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN)
A phase II trial to assess the effects of tamoxifen on the mutant allele burden and disease course in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms
Researchers want to know if tamoxifen, which is already being used to treat breast cancer, could also help people with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) who have JAK2 and the CALR gene changes. Tamoxifen will be given alongside the standard treatment for MPN.

MAJIC trial

Chief investigator - Professor Claire Harrison, Guys and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust
Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN)
A phase II study of ruxolitinib (INCB424) in patients with high risk polycythaemia vera or essential thrombocythaemia resistant to or intolerant of standard therapy
This study is for people with a type of blood disorder called myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), which includes polycythaemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythaemia (ET). Doctors usually treat these blood cancers MPNs with chemotherapy, but treatment isn't suitable for everyone. Researchers think that a drug called ruxolitinib may help people with high risk PV and high risk ET who are unable to have chemotherapy. 

TAP for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)

Treatment options for MDS can vary widely. Some people may just need treatment to control their symptoms, but others may need more intensive treatment like chemotherapy, or even a stem cell transplant. 

We are supporting a trial called ELASTIC that wants to see if adding a drug called eltrombopag helps to improve the success of azacitidine treatment.

We are also supporting trials that are looking at ways to treat people who have relapsed MDS after a stem cell transplant. And we are finding alternative treatments for older people who have high-risk MDS who are unable to tolerate high intensity chemotherapy.

RAvVA trial

Chief investigator - Professor Charles Craddock, University Hospital Birmingham
Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)
A randomised phase II trial of 5-azacitidine versus 5-azacitidine in combination with vorinostat in patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia ineligible for salvage chemotherapy
In this trial, researchers want to know if azacitidine given with vorinostat is better than azacitidine alone in people with AML or high risk MDS who are unable to tolerate intensive chemotherapy.

VIOLA trial

Chief investigator - Professor Charles Craddock, University Hospital Birmingham
Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)
A phase I trial of combined azacitidine and lenalidomide salvage therapy in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation
People with AML or MDS are usually treated with high doses of chemotherapy, followed by a stem cell transplant. But AML and MDS can come back after a transplant, and when it does it becomes much more difficult to treat. Researchers want to know if combining azacitidine and lenalidomide can help this group of people.