Using animals in research

20 Aug 2015

We want to have the biggest impact for blood cancer patients. Because of this, we believe that using animals in research, in the right way, is the right thing to do.

As a significant funder of blood cancer research, our discoveries have done much to help understand different types of blood cancer and identify life-saving treatments. But there is much more to do before we can say we've achieved our mission of beating blood cancer.

We are a member of the Association of Medical Research Charities (AMRC) and support their position statement on the use of animals in research. We recognise that not everybody is comfortable with the use of animals in research. It is not a decision we take lightly and we only fund high quality research that has been peer-reviewed by experts, where the benefits to health are significant and where there is no alternative. 

A considerable amount of research that we fund doesn't use animals. This type of research may include using cells and human tissue, modelling and human volunteers. But important questions about how biological systems work can sometimes only be answered by using animals.

Where animals are used we take the following steps:

  • We are committed to supporting UK legislation focused on replacing, reducing and refining animal use in research by
    • Replacing the use of animals with alternative methods or avoiding their use altogether
    • Reducing the number of animals used in experiments
    • Refining research methods to minimise suffering and improve animal welfare
  • All our research grant holders adhere to the code of practice on the housing and care of animals as required by the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986.
  • We are a signatory to the Concordat on Openness on Animal Research which sets out how organisations report the use of animals in scientific, medical and veterinary research in the UK.

For more information about the use of animals in our research, read our frequently asked questions.