Low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (LGNHL)

Low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (LGNHL)

The term low-grade non Hodgkin lymphoma (low-grade NHL) can be used to describe a number of different types of slow-growing lymphoma, including follicular lymphoma, Waldenstrom macroglobulinaemia (WM), mantle cell lymphoma and marginal zone lymphoma.

In around 30% of low-grade NHL transforms into high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

We are supporting research that hopes to improve the way people with mantle cell lymphoma are managed, and a project that hopes to find new ways to treat splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

 

 

Mantle cell lymphoma

Even though mantle cell lymphoma is classed as low grade, in most people it is considered an aggressive, fast-growing lymphoma. Some cases develop far more slowly and don’t need treatment straight away, but at the moment doctors can’t tell if the disease is likely to be fast or slow progressing at the time a patient is diagnosed.

People are usually treated when they are diagnosed. But in Plymouth, people with mantle cell lymphoma have been watched without therapy if they have no symptoms at diagnosis. We are supporting research that will analyse people who didn’t need therapy for at least 2 years and compare this to those needing immediate treatment.

Improving the diagnosis of people with mantle cell lymphoma

Lead researcher - Professor Simon Rule, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust
Lymphoma Low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (LGNHL)
Cell Bank: Establishing a Biobank and Database as a National Resource for Characterising Indolent and Aggressive forms of Mantle Cell Lymphoma
Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive lymphoma and generally has a poor outcome. However, it is becoming clear that a subgroup of patients have disease that behaves in an indolent way. It is not yet possible to know who these patients are at diagnosis. It is the norm to treat patients with MCL at diagnosis, however for over a decade in Plymouth, patients have been watched without any therapy if they have no symptoms at diagnosis. This practise has proven that around 30% patients do not need immediate treatment with some requiring no treatment for over 10 years.

Splenic marginal zone lymphoma

Marginal zone lymphomas develop from B cells that are found in the ‘marginal zone’- the outside edge of lymphoid tissue, such as the lymph nodes or spleen.

Splenic marginal zone lymphoma is a very rare, slow growing lymphoma found in the spleen. It has a very variable clinical outcome – most cases are slow growing, but some people may have aggressive disease. Currently, doctors are unable to predict the outcome of people with splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

We have a research project that hopes to find new ways to treat splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

Personalised treatments for splenic marginal zone lymphoma

Chief investigator - Professor Ming-Qing Du, University of Cambridge
Lymphoma Low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (LGNHL)
Splenic marginal zone lymphoma: KLF2 mutation and its molecular oncogenic mechanism
Splenic marginal zone lymphoma: KLF2 mutation and its molecular oncogenic mechanismGenetic changes in the KLF2 gene have been found in splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL). Professor Ming-Qing Du will investigate how these changes influence SMZL development, and aims to use this information to develop new treatment strategies.

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