Leukaemia TAP trials

Leukaemia TAP trials

We are supporting trials for people with CLL, CML and AML through our Trials Acceleration Programme.

We have a series of trials that are exploring new drugs and treatment combinations for people with CLL who have relapsed or continued to get worse on their current treatment.

We also have a CML trial that specifically wants to improve the outlook for people who are doing less well, and have progressed to the more advance stage of disease.

And our researchers are looking for new treatments for people with AML who cannot have conventional chemotherapy, and for those who relapse after a stem cell transplant.

TAP for AML

We are supporting a number of clinical trials for people living with AML.

People with AML are usually treated with high doses of chemotherapy, followed by a stem cell transplant. But AML can come back after a transplant, and when it does it becomes much more difficult to treat. And some people may not be able to have chemotherapy because they are too frail.

Research is taking place to test new drug combinations as quickly as possible, and to find potential new treatments for people who are unable to have conventional chemotherapy because they are too frail. 

Doctors are also looking at ways to prevent AML from returning after stem cell transplantation.

RAvVA trial

Chief investigator - Professor Charles Craddock, University Hospital Birmingham
Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)
A randomised phase II trial of 5-azacitidine versus 5-azacitidine in combination with vorinostat in patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia ineligible for salvage chemotherapy
In this trial, researchers want to know if azacitidine given with vorinostat is better than azacitidine alone in people with AML or high risk MDS who are unable to tolerate intensive chemotherapy.

ROMAZA trial

Chief investigator - Professor Charles Craddock, University Hospital Birmingham
Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)
Phase I trial of romidepsin plus azacitidine in patients with newly diagnosed, relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukaemia ineligible for conventional chemotherapy
People with AML are usually given chemotherapy, but not everyone can have this type of treatment. Researchers think that combining azacitidine with romidepsin may help people with AML who can’t have standard chemotherapy treatment.

VIOLA trial

Chief investigator - Professor Charles Craddock, University Hospital Birmingham
Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)
A phase I trial of combined azacitidine and lenalidomide salvage therapy in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation
People with AML or MDS are usually treated with high doses of chemotherapy, followed by a stem cell transplant. But AML and MDS can come back after a transplant, and when it does it becomes much more difficult to treat. Researchers want to know if combining azacitidine and lenalidomide can help this group of people.

TAP for CLL

Many people with CLL are treated successfully with chemotherapy and a biological drug called rituximab. But not all people will do well on these drugs, and some eventually relapse. At the moment bone marrow transplantation is the only true cure for CLL, but some people may not be able to undergo this treatment because they are too frail. 

We are supporting clinical trials that are looking at new drugs and treatment combinations for people with CLL who have relapsed or continued to get worse on their current treatment.

Researchers are also looking for treatments that will slow down the disease in its early stages, so we can prevent progression and the need for strong drugs.

CyCLLe trial

Chief investigator - Professor Stephen Devereux, Kings College London
Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL)
An investigation of the effect of cyclosporine-A in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: Development of a novel in-vivo strategy for dissecting the mechanism of drug action
Researchers are looking for treatments that will slow down the disease in its early stages and prevent progression and the need for such strong drugs. They want to see if cyclosporin A can affect the rate at which leukaemia cells grow, and if this could be an effective treatment for people with early CLL. 

IciCLLe extension

Chief investigator - Professor Peter Hillmen, St James's University Hospital
Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL)
A phase II assessment of the mechanism of action of PCI-32765 in B-cell receptor pathway inhibition in CLL
Bone marrow transplantation is the only cure for CLL at the moment, but some people may not be able to undergo this treatment because they are too frail. Chemotherapy can be effective, but can have serious side effects especially in older people. Researchers know that ibrutinib works for people with CLL, but they want to see if combining it with obinutuzumab gives added benefit.

TAP for CML

TKIs have improved the outcome for people with CML dramatically. However this improvement remains limited to people who receive TKI treatment whilst in the chronic phase of their disease. Unfortunately, the majority of people whose disease has progressed to blast phase have already received all the available drugs in succession during the chronic phase, so there is no TKI available when they progress. If this happens, people are usually given intensive treatment comprising high dose of chemotherapy alongside a TKI, and then a stem cell transplant.

We are supporting a trial that wants to know if adding a new TKI called ponatinib alongside conventional chemotherapy can help people who are in the blast phase of their CML.