Lymphoma TAP trials

Lymphoma TAP trials

Updated 18 Jan 2018

Our clinical trials are finding new ways to treat lymphoma, and are focusing on diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Hodgkin lymphoma, and peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), as well as rarer forms such as peripheral central nervous system (PCNS) lymphoma.

TAP for Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL)

Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is usually treated by chemotherapy together with an antibody therapy called rituximab. However, this approach is not always successful - many people do not respond, or only have a partial response, so further 'salvage' treatment is needed. If salvage treatment is unsucessful, a stem cell transplant may be given, but sometimes the DLBCL returns after this. 

We are supporting the TORCH trial, which is looking at a new drug called vistusertib for people with DLBCL that has continued to grow during standard treatment, or has come back afterwards.

TAP for High-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma

TIER trial

Chief investigator - Dr Christopher Fox, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust
Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)
A phase I/II study of thiotepa, ifosphamide, etoposide and rituximab for the treatment of relapsed and refractory primary central nervous system lymphoma
Researchers are looking for new ways to treat people with PCNSL - a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that only affects the central nervous system. The trial is trying a new combination of cancer drugs comprising of chemotherapies and a biologic drug. 

TORCH trial

Chief investigator - Dr Graham Collins, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
Lymphoma Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)
A phase II study to determine the safety and efficacy of the dual mTORC inhibitor AZD2014 and to investigate additional toxicities in combination with rituximab in relapsed refractory DLBCL
This trial is looking at a new biological therapy called vistusertib for people with diffuse B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that has continued to grow during standard treatment of chemotherapy and rituximab, or has come back afterwards. 

RomiCar trial

Chief investigator - Dr Graham Collins, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
Lymphoma Burkitt lymphoma
A phase I/II study to determine the maximum tolerated dose and overall response rate of the combination of romidepsin and carfilzomib in relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphoma
People with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) are usually given chemotherapy, but sometimes it continues to grow, or comes back after the treatment has finished. Researchers want to know if combining romidepsin - a HDAC inhibitor - and carfilzomib - a proteasome inhibitor - could help people with PTCL that has come back, or standard treatment has stopped working for them.

TAP for Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL)

People with Hodgkin lymphoma are usually treated with chemotherapy, but some are too frail to have this type of treatment, or have another medical condition which means they cannot have chemotherapy.

We are supporting the BREVITY trial, which is looking a targeted biological therapy called brentuximab vedotin.

Brentuximab vedotin has been shown to be effective for people whose Hodgkin lymphoma has come back after chemotherapy treatment, and researchers want to see if this drug may also help people who can’t have standard chemotherapy. 

BREVITY trial

Chief investigator - Professor John Radford, University of Manchester and the Christie NHS Foundation Trust
Hodgkin lymphoma
A phase II study of brentuximab vedotin (SGN-35) using a response adapted design in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma unsuitable for chemotherapy due to age, frailty or co-morbidity
Brentuximab vedotin - a type of biological therapy- has been shown to be effective for people whose Hodgkin lymphoma has come back after chemotherapy treatment. In this trial, researchers want to see if this drug can help people who can’t have standard chemotherapy. Because brentuximab vedotin is a targeted therapy, it may also have less side effects than chemotherapy.

TAP for peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL)

People with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) are usually given a combination of chemotherapy drugs, but this may not work for everyone. And for people who relapse after this course of treatment, there are limited treatment options available.

We are supporting two clinical trials looking into new treatments for this group of people.

The AVAIL-T trial is looking at an antibody drug called avelumab, which has been used to treat other cancer types with some success. We are also supporting a trial called RomiCAR which wants to know if combining two targeted drugs - romidepsin and carfilzomib - could help people with PTCL that has come back, or standard treatment has stopped working for them.

RomiCar trial

Chief investigator - Dr Graham Collins, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
Lymphoma Burkitt lymphoma
A phase I/II study to determine the maximum tolerated dose and overall response rate of the combination of romidepsin and carfilzomib in relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphoma
People with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) are usually given chemotherapy, but sometimes it continues to grow, or comes back after the treatment has finished. Researchers want to know if combining romidepsin - a HDAC inhibitor - and carfilzomib - a proteasome inhibitor - could help people with PTCL that has come back, or standard treatment has stopped working for them.

TAP for Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL)

Peripheral central nervous system (PCNS) lymphoma is rare. These types of lymphomas start in the brain or spinal cord (central nervous system).

People with PCNS lymphoma are usually given chemotherapy with the biologic drug rituximab. This course of treatment often works well, but the outlook for the large proportion of people with PCNS lymphoma who relapse is poor. 

Our researchers are looking for new treatments for people with PCNS in a clinical trial called TIER.

TIER trial

Chief investigator - Dr Christopher Fox, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust
Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)
A phase I/II study of thiotepa, ifosphamide, etoposide and rituximab for the treatment of relapsed and refractory primary central nervous system lymphoma
Researchers are looking for new ways to treat people with PCNSL - a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that only affects the central nervous system. The trial is trying a new combination of cancer drugs comprising of chemotherapies and a biologic drug.